• Traditional Human Resources management was predominantly about implementing set directives and guidelines from the upper management. By contrast, Strategic HR management is about looking at what is best for the employees, and through them for the company in the long-term future. Furthermore, while thinking and working strategically, there is no room for time-consuming tedious jobs and repetitive manual tasks. Employees will have more time available to them for more important tasks such as talent forecast, and pipeline succession among others by automating the HR process. With the right automation tool, the process can become relatively easier and reap invaluable benefits. Companies with a full understanding of the processes and benefits of automation know that automation is no longer a competitive advantage but a necessity in the face of growing competition.

     


  • Human Resource Management is a fundamental part or function of any organization, regardless of its size. Whether it is hiring new employees, training, or ensuring that local labour laws are complied with, HR processes cannot be taken lightly. However, the function of the HR department has always been perceived as manual and tedious. Nevertheless, with the entry of automation into HR spaces, that is all changing for the better. Companies are thinking of ways to automate processes wherever possible, and HRM is one obvious choice for the same. So what does this mean for current and future HR professionals? They need to adapt to the coming changes or be left behind in the dust.

     


  • Employee surveillance and productivity monitoring date back more than a century. However, it is barely recognizable today compared to the days of Ford Motor Company. Back then, companies would send inspectors to the homes of their employees unannounced to see what they are actually up to. Today’s technology allows employers to keep an eye on keystrokes and mouse movements on the laptops used by their employees, comb emails and even see what is on their screens. The use of biometric employee IDs has also allowed employers to track their employee’s physical location and the length of their conversations with a colleague.